How A Home Energy Review Differs From a Home Energy Report?

How A Home Energy Review Differs From a Home Energy Report?

A home energy review is a great tool to help you save HUGE savings on your monthly energy bill but how does it differ from a home inspection report? Well, for one. We are looking to save you money not up your insurance costs. Secondly, it’s not as extensive and picky and it benefits you unlike some home inspections which end up being pains in the neck in the long run because they either have to be redone or don’t end up helping you get the best bang for your buck in terms of home insurance.

Most home buyers are familiar with the practice of having a home inspection performed prior to closing on a new house. In fact, most mortgage companies require home inspections.A home inspector’s report will review the condition of the home’s heating system, central air conditioning system (temperature permitting), interior plumbing, electrical systems, roof, attic, visible insulation, walls, ceilings, floors, windows, doors, foundation, basement, and visible structure.

While home inspection companies do look at energy efficiency related systems in homes, their inspections are visual, and they typically do not give you detailed information about how old your furnace or heat pump is or what their efficiency Continue reading

By

Read More

What Exactly Controls My Air Conditioning Unit?

When you have both a thermostat and a humidistat, it can be difficult to figure out what exactly controls your air conditioning. For example, let’s say you just recently replaced your air conditioner and the new controls will only run the if your air conditioning unit both the temperature and the humidity settings are exceeded. What should you do?

The most common configuration of thermostat and humidistat for controlling air conditioners involves the two working separate controls. The air conditioner turns on if the conditions in the home meet the set points for either the thermostat (i.e. 88 degrees F) or the humidistat (58% relative humidity). You can easily check if you have this type of configuration by:

First, check if temperature alone turns on air conditioner. Set the humidistat to the highest relative humidity requirement (largest RH %) and then set the thermostat cooling setting to the lowest temperature. If the air conditioner turns on after a few minutes, it confirms that the thermostat can control it independently.

Furthermore, check if relative humidity alone turns on the air conditioner. Set the thermostat cooling setting to the highest temperature, and then set the humidistat to the Continue reading

What To Do When Your A/C Loses Control

As a Florida native myself, I’m not sure how it happens but the A/C just gets tired of cooling down my house and it starts pushing out warm air. When this happens, I always turn off my A/C, give it about thirty minutes to an hour break, and then I turn it back on. This usually fixes the issue.

Yet, sometimes the issue can be as strange as replacing your A/C with new controls and the A/C will only run if both the temperature and the humidity settings are exceeded. What should you do then? Good question. The air conditioner only turns on if it meets the set points on either the thermostat or the humidistat.

Some steps to take to reconfigure these settings on your new controls for your air conditioner:

  • Check to see if the temperature alone turns on the air conditioner.

Set the humidistat to the highest relative humidity requirement. Then, set the thermostat to the lowest temperature setting. If the air conditioner turns on after a few minutes, the thermostat can control the air conditioner by itself.

 

  • Check to see if relative humidity alone turns on the air conditioner.

Set the thermostat cooling setting to Continue reading